Genealogy of the Scales Family

Subsequent Entitlement to the De Scales Barony

 
Subsequent Entitlement to the Title 'Lord Scales'
Although the De Scales peerage fell into abeyance on the death of Anthony Woodville, Lord Rivers, moieties of the barony are deemed to have passed down to some of the descendants of Elizabeth and Margaret de Scales, who in principle have a right to pursue termination of the abeyance and reinstatement of the title Lord Scales for themselves. Some of these would have held more prestigious titles and not shown any interest. Some people with the name Scales these days might wonder if they have any connection to all of this. I think I am fairly safe in saying that nobody at present called Scales will be able to establish a link via the historical record. The name, as mentioned earlier, also has origins outside of the nobility. However ...
According to Nicolas's The Historic Peerage of England (see the references page) there were two moieties of the Barony of Scales in existence in the latter part of the 19th century, one deriving from Elizabeth de Scales and one from Margaret de Scales.
Descendants of Elizabeth de Scales
Beginning with Elizabeth's heirs, the male line of Sir William Tyndale (see the previous page) continued unabated in Norfolk and Essex until John Tyndale (d.1706). He had just one child, a daughter Elizabeth, who married Jasper Blythman Esq. Their only child Lucy Blythman married Charles King Esq. and they had two daughters and coheirs. Elizabeth King married Rev. William Campbell and had no children. Lucy King married Rev. Richard Bullock and survived her sister, who died in 1779, and represents one moiety of the Barony of Scales.
Descendants of Margaret de Scales
As for Margaret's hiers, John de Vere 12th Earl of Oxford (see the previous page), a Lancastrian loyalist beheaded in 1462, was succeeded by John de Vere 13th Earl of Oxford (1442-1512), also a Lancastrian, who survived to become a key figure under Henry VII but had no children by either of his wives. He was succeeded by his nephew John de Vere 14th Earl of Oxford (1499-1526), who was Lord Great Chamberlain of England and attended Henry VIII at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. However, he seems to have indulged in the good life a little too much and in 1523 the king orderered him to 'moderate his excessive hunting, drink less wine, not stay up late, eat less meat, and forbear excessive and superfluous apparel'. I'm already feeling a certain kinship with him. He died without issue aged only 26.
This is where things become complicated because he was succeeded by his second cousin John de Vere 15th Earl of Oxford (1482-1540) but the moiety of the Barony was split between his nephew Sir Edward Norris (son of his aunt Joan), his four sisters and the 15th Earl. The sisters were:
  • Elizabeth, who married Sir Anthony Wingfield. They evidently had eight sons and seven daughters, the only one I can identify being Elizabeth Naunton.
  • Margaret, about whom nothing further is known.
  • Dorothea, who married John Neville, 3rd Lord Latimer. They had a son, John Neville, 4th Lord Latimer, and a daughter, Margaret Neville, whose marriage is not recorded. John senior went on to beat Henry VIII to the hand of Katherine Parr.
  • Ursula, who married twice but had no issue.
According to Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (see the references page), by the latter part of the 19th century this moiety of the Barony was divided between:
  • John James Hugh Henry Stewart-Murray, 7th Duke of Atholl (1840-1917).
  • Winchcombe Henry Howard Hartley of Lyegrove, Gloucestershire (d. 1881).
  • Rainald Knightley, 1st Baron Knightley of Fawsley, Northamptonshire (1819-1895).
  • Robert Burdett, 6th Baronet of Bramcote, Warwickshire (1796-1880).
  • Charles Robert Tempest, 1st Baronet of Broughton Hall and Coleby, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (1794-1865).
  • Frederick Charles Standish of Standish Hall, Lancashire (1824-1883).
  • Mrs. Troth Jenkins.
  • John Francis Wright of Kelvedon Hatch, Essex (d.1868).
  • John Rogerson Rollo, 10th Lord Rollo of Duncrub, Perthshire (1835-1916).
  • George William Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon (1800-1870).
  • Montague Bertie, 6th Earl of Abingdon (1808-1884).
It is possible to establish the genealogy of some of the above using the prodigious website The Peerage (see the references page).
 
John Stewart-Murray, 7th Duke of Atholl, was a captain in the Scots Fusilier Guards and later Lord Lieutenant of Perthshire. He was a descendant of John Murray, 1st Marquess of Atholl (1631-1703) who married Lady Amelia Anne Sophie Stanley (d.1703). She was the granddaughter of William Stanley, 6th Earl of Derby (1561-1642), and Lady Elizabeth de Vere (d.1627), the daughter of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (1550-1604 - see the previous page) by his second marriage.
Winchcombe Henry Howard Hartley was a landed gentleman at Bucklebury House in Berkshire. He was descended from the marriage of Frances de Vere (1517-1577), daughter of the abovementioned 15th Earl of Oxford, from whom the moiety of the Barony descended, and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547), son of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (see previous page), both of whom were descendants of Margaret de Scales.
Rainald Knightley, 1st Baron Knightley of Fawsley, was a Conservative Party Member of Parliament. He was descended from Thomas Knightley of Burghall, Staffordshire, son of Sir Valentine Knightley of Fawsley, Northamptonshire (d.1566). The family later moved back to Fawsley. I have not been able to find any connection of this family to the Barony. A distant ancestor of Valentine married into the Burgh family, explaining the Burghall connection.
Robert Burdett, 6th Baronet of Bramcote, served as Sheriff of Derbyshire. He was, significantly, descended from the abovementioned Thomas Knightley of Burghall. Robert was descended from another Robert Burdett (d.1716), who married Elizabeth Tracy (1679-1747). She was the daughter of William Tracy, 4th Viscount Tracy of Rathcoole (1657-1712) and Lady Frances Devereux (1659-1687). Frances was the granddaughter of Sir Walter Devereux (1578-bef.1658), who married Elizabeth Knightley, daughter of Thomas. The connection to the Barony seems to be further up the tree, but remains a mystery to me.
Charles Robert Tempest, 1st Baronet of Broughton Hall and Coleby, was High Sheriff of Yorkshire and later Deputy Lieutenant of Lincolnshire. He actually claimed to be a co-heir to the Barony and his case was heard in the House of Lords in 1856. It cost him £3000 (about £130,000 in today's money) to pursue, but he was apparently successful in proving his descent from Margaret de Scales. Unfortunately he died unmarried and the Barony remained in abeyance. He was the son of Stephen Tempest (1756-1824) and Elizabeth Blundell. Her grandfather Robert Blundell (d.1773) married Catherine Stanley, who was presumably descended from William Stanley, 6th Earl of Derby, and Lady Elizabeth de Vere (see above). However, I have not been able to trace the details in the standard peerage records, which is presumably why it cost Sir Charles so much money to do so.
The ancestry of Frederick Charles Standish eludes me. He went to Australia in 1852, where he became Chief Commissioner of Police in Victoria and was involved in the capture of the Ned Kelly Gang.
Mrs. Troth Jenkins remains a mystery to me.
John Francis Wright of Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, was a landed gentleman with a seat at Kelvedon Hall. His family had resided there since the 16th century, but I have not been able to find much genealogical information.
John Rogerson Rollo, 10th Lord Rollo of Duncrub, Perthshire, was a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant of Perthshire and Dumfriesshire. His family can be traced back to mediaeval times but again I can find no connection with the Barony.
George William Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon, was a diplomat and statesman. He was descended from the marriage of Sir Edward Villiers (1620-1689) to Lady Frances Howard (d.1677), whose great-great-grandparents were the abovementioned Henry Howard and Frances de Vere.
Montague Bertie, 6th Earl of Abingdon, was a Member of Parliament who later became Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire. He was descended from James Bertie, 1st Earl of Abingdon (1653-1699), who was the son of Montague Bertie, 2nd Earl of Lindsey (1608-1666) and his second wife Bridget Wray, Baroness Norris (1627-1657). Her grandmother was Lady Bridget de Vere (d.1645), another daughter of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (see the previous page), by his second marriage.
 
You can, if you feel so inclined, trace many of the descendants of the above at the website The Peerage or, presumably, through the census returns. I have not yet had the opportunity to consult a recent edition of Burke's Peerage, so it is still to me an open question where the moieties of the abeyant De Scales Barony reside these days.
John Stewart-Murray, 7th Duke of Atholl
 
Winchcombe Henry Howard Hartley
 
Rainald Knightley, 1st Baron Knightley
 
George William Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon
 
John Rogerson Rollo, 10th Lord Rollo
 
The photograph of Middleton Towers is İGraham Brown LRPS, sourced from the National Monuments Record and used by kind permission of English Heritage.
Freely licensed images courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.
 
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